"Red Indians"
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"Red Indians"
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Diary entry reprinted in JUKES, J. Beete, Excursions in and about Newfoundland: During the years 1839 and 1840, vol. II

Mr. Peyton entertained us with discoursing of the Red Indians. He had frequently seen them, having found them on the Red Indians Lake and elsewhere. He had captured one of the women, who was taken to St. John's and who lived some time with Mrs. P. as a servant. He described them as a fierce and savage race, supporting themselves entirely by hunting and fishing, and forming their wigwams not of bark, like the Mic-Macs, but of skins. These wigwams were raised on wooden platforms, which, together with some other structures intended apparently for storehouses, were formed with much skill. They seem to have had many peculiar manners and customs, the record of which is now probably lost for ever.

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Many years ago they were very troublesome to the European settlers, frequently stealing boats, nets, and implements.

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Their destruction, however, was not wholly due to the English, the French had a still greater hatred of them, and contempt of their lives, which they even to this day preserve.

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The Mic-Mac Indians were, however, the most efficient instruments of their destruction; and according to the account which an old Mic-Mac Indian gave to Mr. Peyton, the first enmity between the two races arose in this way. When the Mic-Macs first visited the country, they and the Red Indians were friendly. About a hundred years ago, however, the French offered a reward for the head of every Red Indian.