"When Memory Fails"
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"When Memory Fails"
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Le Devoir, Friday, August 27, 1999
(Excerpt of an article from the August edition of Action nationale)

This year, the city of Moncton, in Acadia, will host the Summit of francophone countries. One must rejoice to have the Acadians host this important event, because justice is being served. Indeed, few people so richly deserve their place in history. Victims of cruel genocide in the mid-18th century, the Acadian people were able to get back on their feet and fight for their right to exist despite unheard-of hardships. [...]

But the city of Moncton, New Brunswick, owes its name to the British officer Robert Monckton, who was active in Acadia from 1755 to 1758 and in the Quebec City region during the siege of that city by Wolfe in 1759.

The act of naming the city after this soldier raises serious social, political, and ethical problems. As a soldier in Acadia and the Quebec City area, Monckton committed terrible acts of great cruelty which are the equivalent of genocide, crimes against peace, war crimes and crimes against humanity in the sense that we recognize and label them today.